Nasal Tumors

Both benign and malignant tumours of the nasal cavity are uncommon. Very often their separation from tumours of paranasal sinuses is difficult except in early stages. In addition to primary tumours, nasal cavity can be invaded by growths from paranasal sinuses, nasopharynx, cranial and buccal cavity. Benign lesions are usually smooth, localized and covered with mucous membrane. Malignant once are usually friable, have granular surface and tend to bleed easily. Benign tumours includes; Squamous papilloma, Inverted papilloma, Pleomorphic adenoma, Angiofiboma, Glioma, Dermoid, Encephalocele, Haemangioma, Schwannoma, Meningioma & chondroma. Malignant tumours are; Squamous cell carcinoma, Adenocarcinoma, Melanoma, Sarcomas, Lymphoma. Nasal tumours may present as nasal obstruction, bleeding or growth. Investigations used to diagnos are CT scan, Nasal biopsy. Benign tumours are treated with wide local excision of tumour. Malignant tumours are treated with wide local excision, chemotherapy or radiotherapy.

What are the type of Nasal Tumours?

Benign tumours includes; Squamous papilloma, Inverted papilloma, Pleomorphic adenoma, Angiofiboma, Glioma, Dermoid, Encephalocele, Haemangioma, Schwannoma, Meningioma & chondroma. Malignant tumours are; Squamous cell carcinoma, Adenocarcinoma, Melanoma, Sarcomas, Lymphoma.

How do they present?

Nasal tumours may present as nasal obstruction, bleeding or growth.

What is the treatment of Nasal Tumours?

Benign tumours are treated with wide local excision of tumour. Malignant tumours are treated with wide local excision, chemotherapy or radiotherapy.